Grown Up

Grown Up

Humans are an infant species
when compared to the
hundred of millions of years
some species have been
around Mother Earth.
Look at all that we have learned
in the two-hundred thousand years
modern humans have been on the planet.
Likewise, we’ve only had civilizations
for around eighty-five hundred years.
How much more do you imagine
we might learn after we’ve been around
six or eight million years like the whales?

Mother Earth, who, in all probability, is alive
has been around for about
four and a half billion years.
How much do you imagine she’s
happened to learn?
The Universe, in all likelihood, also alive
has been around for at least
thirteen and a half billion years.
Imagine what wonders
she might have learned
in all that time—

Before you despair
the state of Mankind
remember we’ve only begun
our long travels in the halls of time.
Personally, I think we are
destined for great things
once we’ve grown up a bit.

Dewey Dirks

Advertisements

Look, Listen

Look, Listen

Look!
You can see it
filling full the air,
and raining down
from the bright sun
and gray clouds.
You can see it rising up
from the brown earth,
coming out of every building,
and dancing a fine dance
in the green grass and trees.
Rest easy
your tired soul, my friend.
Listen!
The grand song of life
hums quietly a lilting melody.
Softly she forever whispers
of a long love, endless and true
in the velvet breeze.

Dewey Dirks

Roads

Here is a poem from my soon to be released book, “Journey.”

Roads

Islam, Santeria, Hinduism
Christianity, Humanism
Wicca, Buddhism, Shinto,
Agnosticism, Atheism,
Judaism, Taoism, Sikhism,
Skepticism, Shamanism
Baha’i
I have no interest
in judging the roads
others follow
We all see through
different sets of eyes
and walk with
different feet
to each man
an individual path
Still, all roads lead
to the same high mountain
Even if that mountain
is a parking lot in Chicago
or a flat in Riyadh,
Mexico City, Moscow
or Beijing
All rivers lead
to the same great sea
Even if the river you follow
is across the world
from the shore I walk on
We all breath sweet blue air
of the same Earth
Walk under one vast night sky
that touches our souls with
equal tenderness for all
Tomorrow, tomorrow
you and I, my friend
will wake
to greet the same day
Time flows quietly, silently
a soft fabric woven unique
to each of us our own portion
here very quickly, there very slow
Ten thousand solitary footsteps
ten thousand singular sights
ten thousand feelings
for which there are no words
Yet with every morning sunrise
we all meet the same daylight
given freely of the
same brilliant, bright sun
Our creativeness
makes each of us unique
Our common humanity
makes us all brothers and sisters
of the same fold
Love, wit and creativity, you see
are magic—
At once making each of us
a separate melody
and all parts
of the same grand song

Dewey Dirks

In The Details

In The Details

We each are the parent
of our experiences.
Heaven is in hidden
among the details of your day.
The things you most want out of life
have been following you around
for years tugging at your shirttails
like a child whispering happily
‘Daddy look! I’m here!’

Joy is the day you finally stop for a hug.

Bliss is realizing that all through
the long years, your spirit has been stopping
again and again carefully gathering
hugs, and smiles, and laughter, and long talks
without you ever knowing.

One day you look and there it is
traveling right beside you,
all around you and in your memories too;
Fifty years of stored up heaven,
light as a single, brightly colored feather
and as vast as all the vivid world .

Dewey Dirks

King of the World

Here is a poem from my upcoming book, “Lullabies and Legends.”

King of the World

It was late one Thursday night
Down at the Blue Light Lounge
When I walked in no one was there
But Ted, my asshole bartender
And some old biker
With a snow white beard and long gray hair
I sat down beside him and ordered up a beer
I said, “I’m Slammed-Out Sal
And I run this neighborhood
Just who the hell are you
And what are you doin’ in my bar
Drinkin’ my booze and breathin’ my air?”

He laughed and said, “Good to meet you Sal.
I’m Knife-Nose Frank
And I’m king of the world”
Ted winked at me
I took a drink and smiled
Figured I’d have some fun with this toad
“You’re tellin’ me you run the whole damn world?” I asked
“Hell yea” he said, “everyplace, everywhere”
I said “I bet you’re old, maybe two-hundred or more”
Three-hundred five, and a few weeks” he grinned

I took a sip of coor’s and said
“You don’t run it very good.
Everyone’s always fighting”
He said, “You know, I like everyone
But you gotta run things with an easy hand
And people are like kids, spoiled and scrappy
They’re gonna do what they’re gonna do
And they’re gonna play rough
A time or two
Gonna get a bloody nose every once in awhile
What can you do?”

“How come there’s so many countries?” I asked
Seems like it’d be better
If we was all had one government
“I like variety. Variety is good” he smiled
“What about all these different religions?” I asked
“People are gonna think what they want to think
There’s something for everyone
Freedom of religion is good,” he smiled
So what’s the hardest part
Of running the whole damned world, Frank?”
“Keepin’ the proper mix
Of house cats and dog people” he said
“Just what ever do you mean, Frank?” I laughed
He took a drink and grinned back at me
“Well, house cat people are curious and playful
And lots of times they get into trouble
But you gotta have them
Or no books would be written
Paintings wouldn’t get painted
Nothing would get invented
And songs would ‘t be sung
House cat people are a little chaotic
But they do a lot of good things too

Now, dog people don’t like change
And they don’t invent much of anything
But they follow their masters loyally
Keep life stable, work very hard
And help countries live a long, long time
But the house cats and the dogs
Don’t understand each other sometimes
Some days each one looks down on the other
Keepin’ the mix even
And keepin’ one from stomping the other one out
Is the hardest thing I usually do”

Knife-nose Frank stood up and stretched
Said “It’s been nice talkin’ to you Sal
But I’ve got to go
See about some riots in Uzbekistan”
I stood up too
I figured I’d follow him outside
And kick the shit out of him in the parking lot
Then Frank pulled a thousand dollar bill out of his wallet
And slapped it on the bar
He winked at Ted
“Keep the change,” he said

I looked at the money
And followed him outside
Just then a black helicopter flew overhead
And Frank swung his leg over a pure platinum V-4 chopper
When he fired it up, my heart stopped for a second
And I swear the sky moved
He nodded at me and slipped it into gear
I don’t remember him leaving
But as suddenly as he was there, he was gone
My eyes were wide when I walked back in the Blue Light Lounge
Ted must have noticed the look on my face
“Do you want to keep this money for yourself?” he asked
I figured it’d be better to be safe than sorry
“No, you take it” I said,
“I think we’d better do what he wanted”

Dewey Dirks

The Phone Call

The Phone Call

Tomorrow it will have been exactly one year
since Laino passed on.
She and I always used to make a trip
across town twice a month
to the Native American smoke shop to buy cigarettes.
It was always an errand we made together
and we always had a lot of fun on the ride.
Over the years I came to enjoy it very much
as it was time we could spend together,
make a lot of jokes about all kinds of ridiculous stuff
and generally have a very good time.

Now that Laino is gone, I still make
the trip twice a month and I always think of her
on the way remembering
all the good times passed that we had together.
My memories of our smoke shop trip’s
are so vivid it always seems like she’s still there
in the car beside me talking to me
eyes sparkling with a happy smile.

Yesterday, I ran the errand thinking
of Laino all the while.
When I got home, I walked into the house
and put the bag of cigarettes on the kitchen table.
I fished my phone out of my pocket, still thinking
of Laino and the errand I’d just got back from.
I looked down at the phone suddenly astounded
because apparently the coins in my pocket had pushed
the phone touchscreen in such a way that
Lainos name and phone number were up on the display
as though she had just made a call to me from the Summerlands
to say with a smile “Hi baby! Here I am! :).”

I sat at down at the table, still looking at the phone screen
and thought of some lyrics in that song
from the seventies by Kansas, ‘Miracles out of Nowhere,’
— “It’s so simple right before your eyes
If you’ll look through this disguise
It’s always here, it’s always there
It’s just love and miracles out of nowhere.”

Dewey Dirks